Thursday, March 8, 2012

Agaves getting the protection they deserve…

Zipping along an unfamiliar street the other day something caught my eye. First I noted the Echium…
Then the odd window structures, I probably needed to stop and take a closer look right?
Uhmmm…wonder what’s in the little house?
An Agave! Looks to be an A. parryi…
With a Cylindropuntia and Eryngium venustum sharing space under the structure.
Next door, under the second structure…

Was this beauty!
I’m not going to hazard a guess at its name, or the name of the very spiky Opuntia by its side.
Closer to the house was another protective structure (you know I was dying to find out what was inside!) and several more Echium.
Along the street I recognize the Euphorbia, Callistemon, Eryngium agavifolium but not the tall (maybe dead?) plant on the left.
I left this chance garden sighting feeling a sort of strange sense of déjà vu at seeing so much of my plant palette in the garden of someone I don’t know!

13 comments:

  1. Clearly somebody who loves succulents and knows what they're doing! Did you get a chance to talk to them? The noid agave in the middle ("What a beauty") could be Agave montana 'Baccarat'.

    Gerhard
    :: Bamboo and More ::

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    1. No talking, there was nobody home (well, no cars at least). Thanks for the possible i.d. I thought so too but then started second guessing myself.

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  2. That's such an interesting find for you. Of course you probably have a sort of radar for these. Didn't someone recommend a similar treatment in a comment on another of your posts recently?

    I continue to be amazed at the lengths gardeners up that way go to to get these plants to work in their gardens.

    The dangerous opuntia looks like one that popped up in my yard last year. It has been relocated to the cactus patch out back.

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    1. Yes someone did, and I also heard of some very tasteful little agave covers in a garden near me, but by the time I got there they had taken them down. I suppose I need to go knock on their door.

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  3. So...is an optunia the same thing as a prickly pear?

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  4. Gardeners who were separated at birth! Good for this agave-lover who knows the value of keeping her/his precious plants dry enough in winter.

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    1. And they looked darn happy about it too!

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  5. Wow...that's dedication! I will NEVER complain about having to stake a few plants again!

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    1. HaHa...you know I realize I should be doing this but it just goes against my enjoying the garden for what it is over the winter.

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  6. Clearly a succulent lover that knows what they're doing. And generous sized rain shelters too that looks sturdy. Personally though I wouldn't put up rain shelters on a front garden but if it doesn't bother the owner then it's a good thing.

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    1. Me too, I mean I do understand that my plants would be a lot happier if I did this...but it looking at the shelters would not add to my happiness! (sad that I'd rather look at soggy Agaves?)

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  7. Well... better late than never right? Plowing through your archives and I think I recognize the dead looking plant - I'm thinking Eupatorium capillifolium 'Elegant Feather.' When not dormant, it almost has the look of a restio.
    I bought one from Dancing Oaks at the last fall HPSO sale. Then I couldn't find a sunny spot so I donated it to my mom's garden, where it looks rather handsome. NOW I think I have a spot for one. I'll either have to try to talk her into digging one out, or making a trip to Dancing Oaks.

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