Thursday, January 10, 2013

We revisit an extraordinary garden, chapter 1…


I originally shared photos of this garden in October of 2011 (day 1, day 2); however with the harsh shadows of the early morning hour those images were of less than stellar quality. As luck would have it (and I am a very lucky girl) I was invited to return in October of 2012 to see how the garden has progressed and of course take a few photos. We’ll start the visit today in the front garden, then tomorrow progress to the back. Today’s relatively light photo load (30) should be considered the hearty appetizer to tomorrows salad, main course and desert (70 images) you might want to set aside an hour to take it all in. There is a lot to see, you've been warned…

In the photo above we're looking at the house from the street entry, below we've turned to look to the left...

And to the right...

A slightly different angle, also to the right...

Now we've walked along the "outside" of the front right-side fence, reaching the corner and looking back at the house.

You know how blue Christmas lights are kind of hard to look directly at? It was the same way with this Eucalyptus, it was so powder blue that it appeared to glow from within.

My apologies to both you, the reader, and the garden owner, John. Enough time has elapsed since my visit that I've forgotten the name of many of the plants, if there are any you simply must know ask in the comments and I'll try and find out for you. The silver undersides of the leaves on this one were beautiful. (Update...it's a Drymis winteri)

Now we've walked back along the fence and are at the opposite corner looking towards the front garden, standing at the end of the driveway.

Also along the driveway was a late blooming (spectacularly colored) passion flower.

Throughout the garden are several of these tall bent re-bar supports for climbing plants, I appreciate their simplicity.

Eryngium, not sure which one...

And now we'll finally enter the garden (from the driveway) the Nolina 'La Siberica' are substantially larger than last year (at least to my memory)...

On my previous visit to this garden the plant on the left caught my eye and I became mildly obsessed.

I believe it is Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles'...why don't I have one yet? We because it should eventually reach 12 ft tall.

More Nolina.

Turning back to the corner by the driveway.

Since it was mid October when I visited no doubt this Aloe striatula has bloomed by now.

And the opposite corner where you can see a bit of the blue Eucalyptus, a pair of tall Yucca rostrata, Opuntia, Agave, and sinewy gorgeous Manzanita. If this scene reminds you of Cistus nursery that's probably because Mr Hogan was behind the design of the garden.

Arbutus 'Marina'...

Happy tree ferns.

And so much texture!

Okay this is the last image for today. There will be oh so much more tomorrow...come back!

25 comments:

  1. What a gorgeous garden! Tomorrow will be quite a treat. Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles' is also a favorite of mine & I'll make a point of visiting Ian this summer to get one. The only pittosporum that made it through the PKWs in my garden lives in the parking strip - dry lean soil. 'Silver Ruffles' has died a couple of times, probably because I babied it and put it in the best soil possible. It would be way cool to have Mr. Hogan redesign my garden! Happy Thursday and enjoy your snow!

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    1. I want to visit Ian too!!!

      Would you believe there was a 'Silver Ruffles' at the Cistus Parking Lot sale in 2011 and I passed it up. Stupid.

      Snow? Do you know something I don't? (okay yes...there were a few flakes this morning but thankfully nothing that amounted to anything. Hopefully that trend holds)

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  2. My first reaction was, I feel so depressed that my garden doesn't look like that. Then a moment later: But it could if I just planted more cool plants. So thank you for the inspiration!

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    1. You have tons of cool plants Gerard! Of course I would also encourage you to plant more...you've got the zone for it!

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  3. What an appetiser of a post indeed! A beautiful plantsmans garden! Seeing the last two photos has also reignited my interest in rhododendrons with beautiful foliage. Looking forward to the next instalment already!

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    1. I have to admit that Rhody is a definite must have!

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  4. Omg! I'm lusting and longing for both that garden and gardening season!!!! That garden is simply epic. Not that epic is simple, but that is to say epic in the purest sense of the word. I can't wait to see more!!!!!

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    1. I think you're gonna love tomorrow Louis...

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    2. I certainly can't wait!

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  5. Well, you've certainly whetted my appetite. One hour set aside for droolworthy post: check.
    Do you really think 12' is a deal breaker? That plant has come close to hopping into my cart many times. This may be the year.

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    1. You've seen my garden...do I have room for (another) 12ft shrub? (I know what's with this being realistic thing? Don't worry it won't last)

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  6. Well, I devoured those 30 pictures way too fast! What a great garden. I was thinking at first that was Arbutus unedo too, but it's possible it might be Arbutus "Marina.' I've been trying to resist buying plants, but maybe a couple of shrubs...I'd love a Rhodie with that great blue indumentum on it.

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    1. A couple of shrubs never hurt anyone...

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  7. An inspiring garden! I've already seen several ideas I could use in my own. The large pot is gorgeous.

    Beautiful plants and design. Can't wait to see what you have for us tomorrow.

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    1. Yay, I love to share photos that inspire (tomorrow's post stars another gorgeous container!).

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  8. Oooh, those rostratas... do you know if they were largish when planted, or have they grown to that size in situ? Along those lines, how old is this garden? That's a great fence btw.

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    1. Those Y. rostratas were largish when planted. I believe they are brothers to my Y. rostrata Sammy...all part of the same "shipment" at Cistus a few years back.

      As for the age of the garden I believe the first plants went in late summer of 2010. But it's been evolving ever since. And yep...love the fence!

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  9. Arbutus unedo has almost white flowers I think, although there are some cultivars with darker flowers, plus the lovely hybrid 'Marina' with pink flowers.

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    1. That sounds right. I should change it to Arbutus Idunno (hahah, I crack myself up. Sorry).

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  10. Wow wow wow. I can't wait to see the rest of the photos!

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  11. My first thought was: She has been sitting on these lovely pictures since October? And my second thought was: Thank goodness you saved them for a cold and dreary day in January. Thank you! I already took some inspiration from this garden from your original post. I even bought one of those beautiful blue manzanitas, but it's not doing so well and it may not make it through the winter. I think if was sickly from the get-go (not my fault!). Can't wait until tomorrow.

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    1. Glad you saw the logic behind my waiting. I felt bad for while, not posting them right away, but John was very understanding and actually encouraged me to not hurry knowing I'd (and maybe a few others) need a lift in January!

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  12. Danger, I must continually applaud this garden's and your area's appreciation of horticulture, including the dry side - even when it's damp, to me at least. A sight for sore eyes!

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    1. Damp is a bit of an understatement I'm afraid. I really wish we could share with you!

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