Saturday, February 16, 2013

Foliage Follow-up for February

I’m cheating a bit and taking you back to the Yard, Garden & Patio Show for this month’s Foliage Follow-up. Every year our Hardy Plant Society of Oregon puts together a wonderful display of plants with winter interest. These branches and bits are donated from member gardens and our local nurseries. Here are a few things I thought were interesting, maybe you’ll find something new to you that you’ll want to add to your garden…

Metapanax delavayi

Sarracenia rubra subsp. jonesii

Sedum confusum

Eriobotrya japonica

Magnolia maudiae

Magnolia delavayi

Lomatia myricoides


Stachyurus salicifolia

Convolvulus cneorum

Rhododendron 'Ebony Pearl'

Rhododendron argyrophyllum 'Chinese Silver'

Cardiocrinum giganteum seed pods

Iris foetidissima seed pod

Trachycarpus fortunei fruit

In the corner of the display was this attention grabbing foliage dress...perfect for your next night out on the town! For more foliage fun visit Pam's blog Digging, she's our hostess for the event.

19 comments:

  1. Metapanax metapanax... Would love to get hold of one soon!

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  2. I love that foliage gown, it's fabulous! Also the cardiocrinum seedpods, they look like monster mouths with scary teeth!

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    1. I've never wanted to grow cardiocrinum before, but seeing those seed pods I'm seriously considering it.

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  3. The foliage gown is wonderful! Will you be wearing one to the NWFGS with maybe a Carmen Mirandaesque hat made with agaves and cacti? You would look stunning (as always) and make quite a statement. You know I'd do it if this sort of thing came in my size and also, I can't really pull off the strapless look.

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    1. Of course I will! I'll have to ask kind strangers to give my outfit a mist every once and awhile though, just to keep it looking fresh.

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  4. Gorgeous foliage! Great color on the sedum, that might be one I have and didn't know the ID on it.

    Lovely dress too.

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    1. I have to admit after seeing the beautiful color on the sedum I had to come home and look at all of mine to see if any had it to. Thankfully a couple did, most were still just green though.

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  5. The seed pods get my vote for best of show. Thanks for taking us along.

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  6. I'm pretty much convinced that the "hardy plant society of Oregon" is really just the plant society because I think EVERYTHING might be vaguely hardy for you guys! So jealous of all those cool plants!

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    1. After I went to my first Hardy Plant Society plant sale (and came home with a bunch of not so hardy things) my husband has been making fun of the name. It's true there are a lot of wonderful things we can grow here...and of course a few that we can't. Leave it to me to find those ones.

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  7. I always find myself wondering who is willing to cut these nice branches and trusses off their plants.The answer is: better gardeners than me, with bigger plants!

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    1. I did a quick tally as I was taking pictures, as you probably saw the majority seemed to be from Roger Gossler and Sean Hogan. I guess we know when their nurseries get a trimming huh?

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  8. What an eye-catching display! The magnolia leaves are especially handsome, but I can't help being drawn to the little Sedum confusum -- it's always down to succulents for me, it seems.

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    1. I dream of someday having a garden big enough to grow multiple magnolias, I love them so. Then again there are the dreams of a garden full of succulents too...

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  9. This looks like a nice event. The display is well done and I especially like the colors on the sedum. The foliage dress idea is the best and very clever!

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  10. Those pictures are very nice! I like the sedum, but also the Trachycarpus fortunei fruit - so different looking!

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  11. Sedum confusum probably isn't as hardy as S palmeri, and also tends to be shorter lived with wet winters, and prone to dying after a couple of years. Sunset zone 8, and it is mostly just apple green color, I never notice it developing those red tones to any extent here in Berkeley. It has the same acid yellow flowers as Sedum palmeri.

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